MOHC Blog

Welcome to the  MOHC blog, a daily dose of encouragement from Pastor David Chadwick. 

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Community. Fellowship. Family. God created us to belong. It’s a human yearning we all have deep in our souls. Belonging.


This principle holds true from the beginning of time. God created Eve so that Adam would not be alone (Genesis 2:18). Beginning in the garden of Eden - and true to this day - humans are intended to live life together.


Especially followers of Christ. We’re commanded to do so.


There are many reasons for the intentional gathering of believers. As the Church, we are commanded to not forsake the gathering together of believers (Hebrews 10:25). Covid or not. Mask policy or not.


Scripture is clear, “Two are better than one” (Ecclesiastes 4:9). And while it’s a popular slogan in today’s culture, God was the original author of “Better together.”


If you haven’t already, create community in your personal life. Find a prayer partner. For where two or more are gathered together, there is the presence - and power - of Jesus (Matthew 18:19).


Commit to weekly church attendance. Gather regularly with other believers - especially for prayer.


Yes, you were saved by grace alone (Ephesians 2:8-9). But God never intended for you to go through life alone.

It’s a proverb I’ve never forgotten: The same sun that melts the ice hardens the clay.


Said another way: When bad things happen to you, you can either become bitter or better.


God is indeed using all things for good for those who love him and are called according to his purposes (Romans 8:28). God always uses all things for good. Even though - at the time - we are unable to see it.


Why? Because in our humanness, we have developed preconceived notions about certain circumstances that we - not God - deem to be adverse. Bad. Harmful. Hurtful. Detrimental.


But God says otherwise.


Even if a person may have intended something to harm you, God can - and will - use it for good (Genesis 50:20). There are many examples of this principle in the Bible, but perhaps none as illustrative as the life of Joseph in Genesis 37-50.


Always trust God. He uses everything for his purposes. In his timing and seasons (Ecclesiastes 3:1-11).


For your good. And his glory.

I’ve practiced one leadership style throughout my forty-plus years of ministry that has been invaluable to me as a leader. I like to call it procrastinational leadership.


I can’t remember exactly where I read it, I think in a book somewhere. But it’s served me well, leading me time and time again to make the best decision I could have made at the time.


Why? Because it’s often impossible to know what to do at the moment. In a split second. The blink of an eye. Especially without having all the facts, lines can be blurred.


That’s why I procrastinate when making major decisions. Instead of deciding hastily, I wait on the Lord. It’s indeed biblical: “Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him” (Psalm 37:7). Or “If one gives an answer before he hears, it is his folly and shame” (Proverbs 18:13).


Waiting before making a decision gives God time to reveal his will over mine. Which can’t be done instantaneously. It takes time for most all to be known and understood.


If you’re facing a decision, kick the can down the road as long as you are able. Procrastinate for as long as possible. Get as much insight and information as you can.


And wait on the Lord.


Then you are able to make the best decision possible.