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  • Writer's pictureDavid and Marilynn Chadwick

Davidisms - Miser and Miserable: The Same Etymological Source

Do you know that the Bible gives us a specific trait that God loves in people?

It does. God loves a cheerful giver (2 Cor. 9:7). The word “cheerful” in the Greek is “hilarios.” And we can all think of an English word that sounds similar - “hilarious.” God loves it when we hilariously give to others. If God loves a cheerful giver, then the opposite must be true as well. It’s why the word “miser” and “miserable” come from the same etymological source. A miserly person probably is indeed miserable! Clutching to things that don’t last. Hoarding earthly possessions that rust, are eaten away by moths, and stolen by thieves (Mat. 6:19-21). And becoming exceedingly angry when those things are taken away. That’s why Jesus said it is more blessed to give than to receive (Acts 20:25). And why misers are often quite miserable. And why people who give are so hilariously happy.

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